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Posts Tagged ‘ Grief Coaching ’

How to Apologize without Saying You’re Sorry, by Tony Stoltzfus

Apologies are important: ever been in a situation where you got really hurt and the other individual wouldn’t even so much as apologize to you? That’s one of the ultimate snubs: you got hurt, but…
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Coaching When Disaster Strikes, by Keith E. Webb

How can coaches respond and help with natural disasters like the earthquake in Haiti? There are many ways, from giving and going to coaching from home. Lessons learned from the 2004 Asian Tsunami can help…
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Coaching Separated Men, Part I: An Interview with a Coach Who’s Been There by Jeff Williams

Some coaching ministries evolve out of painful experiences. This is exactly how Rich Wildman[1] developed compassion for separated men. He and his wife Sharon were separated 16 months before a successful reconciliation. Today he serves men that are enduring the painful and scary challenge of reconciling their marriage by coaching them.
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Forced to Leave the Field, by A Missionary

We were 21 when God called us overseas; we dedicated the rest of our lives to work as missionaries. That’s what missionaries did in our generation.  We worked overseas for 27 years; during that time…
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Grief Coaching: A Great Way to Mourn with the Mourning

Few people expect to get “the call”. I always figured it happened to others, but wouldn’t happen to me. Yet, there I was screaming in the phone “NO” as my dad had just told me that my son, Landon, was in an accident and might be dead. He was visiting grandpa’s house riding four-wheelers when he lost control and ran through a barb-wired fence…Our recovery has been a long journey. Along the way we discovered coaching as a great way to relate people that are grieving. Coaching is a natural fit for what a grieving person needs.
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Coaching the Newly Divorced Woman, by Lynn Kinnaman

The woman who calls you is angry. Her husband left her, and she doesn’t know what she’s going to do. It’s not the divorce that’s making her mad, she insists. That was a relief. Her life will be better, she explains, because he had been distant/unsupportive/abusive for the last few years anyway. She’s just upset because of how he did it, or when he did it, or why. She just wants to put it behind her.
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